Ethnocentrism Rears Its Ugly Head in the Cancellation of ABC’s “Eli Stone”

by Guest Contributor Nina, originally published at Threshold of Your Own Mind

Last year during Christmas, ABC had the genius idea to cancel Eli Stone. And by cancel, I mean completely phase out mid-season. The show was in the primetime line up and it aired before Boston Legal.

Eli Stone was set in a San Francisco law firm. It was cleverly written and extremely progressive. Like San Francisco, it had a gamut of diversity. It featured Black and Asian actors cast in roles of doctors and lawyers. The lawyers handled cases with gay, lesbian and trans issues. There was a strong social activist element to the firm where ethics and humanity were prevalent in the all too cut-throat world of lawyers.

Most importantly, the show dealt with issues of spirituality & alternative medicine. Eli Stone, the man for which the show was named, was a prophet who was struggling with the gift of sight. He saw the future and his third eye chakra was off the chains.

His gift was nurtured by a Chinese acupuncturist herbalist who studied and expounded on Ancient Chinese healing practices. He had to adopt the stereotypical “ching-chong” accent to get his white customers to believe his practice was legit, which only added to the cleverness of the show. The Chinese acupuncturist turned the stereotype on it’s head by adapting the voice of what “someone like him” should sound like. Continue reading

Racialicious at the RESI Symposium

by Latoya Peterson

Hey readers!

I’m out here at Texas A & M University at the Race and Ethnic Studies Institute Symposium on Race, Ethnicity, and (New) Media:

The Race & Ethnic Studies Institute at Texas A&M University convenes a symposium every other year, and the proposed theme for the 2008-2009 year is Shifting Terrains: Inequalities in the 21st Century, and the symposium itself is to focus on Race, Ethnicity, and (New) Media. The explosion of work on New Media (including the Internet, mobile devices, Web 2.0) and the juxtaposition and overlap between ‘old’ media (radio, television, film, and mass-print media) and New Media is a rich field of cultural production and scholarly research in which scholars of race and ethnicity have not been particularly well-represented. However, there are cutting edge scholars who do indeed explore various aspects of race/ethnicity and (New) Media (including audience/fan studies, representations of racial and ethnic identities in a variety of media, identity-focused online communities, etc.).

I’m here to present a keynote on “Talking About Race In Digital Space” and present an academic* paper titled “Eww, WTF?!?! You Got Your Social Justice In My Video Game.”

In the meantime, I’m here with some amazing people. Dr. Lisa Nakamura spoke last night, with a keynote titled: ʺDonʹt Hate the Player, Hate the Game: The Racialization of Virtual Labor in Virtual Worlds.ʺ

I’ve been really excited about this conference – you’ll see why when you read the program, after the jump. Continue reading

East High School, Home of the Orientals

by Guest Contributor Angry Asian Man, originally published at Angry Asian Man

When I first saw this, I thought it had it be a joke… but it’s true. The actual mascot of East High School in Rochester, New York is the Orientals. Not the Tigers, or the Mustangs, or the Wildcats. The Orientals. So, say, during football season, or basketball season, opposing teams play against the East Orientals. You can even get your East Orientals apparel here. However, East’s mascot is an eagle. What?

Some Googling reveals that there’s another East High School in Akron, Ohio — also known as the home of the Orientals. I’m not making this up! Believe it or not, their mascot is Chang the Dragon. Seriously. To top it all off, the school’s website is wonderfully adorned with our favorite faux Asian font. They’ve apparently been the Orientals for many, many years… and everybody’s cool with it. I love America.