Links

Jenn at Reappropriate has an interesting perspective on Palin and Bipartisan feminism.

Angry Asian Man points us toward this Complex post on “When Hollywood Rips Off South Korea.” I agree with AAM, as a J.S.A. remake makes no freaking sense. I’m also kind of shocked at the My Wife is a Gangster remake with Queen Latifah. I’ll go borrow Hae’s copy of that one and try to put together a post on that.

Safiya Outlines posts on what not to say about mixed race relationships.

Stereohyped reports that Obama is creating a new office in the White House:

Barack Obama’s transition co-chair and friend Valerie Jarrett confirms that plans are underway to create a White House Office of Urban Policy, which will help to coordinate federal efforts to aid large cities (aka “fake America”).

The Education and Class blog has a link to an interesting study on why qualified low income students do not enroll in college:

With these students — who are disproportionately low-income or students of color — schools are doing their part: These students have taken a college prep curriculum and gotten decent grades.

But, because of the high costs of college, inadequate information about financial aid and loans, and guidance counselors responsible for hundreds of students, these students are not applying for or enrolling in college.

There are so many ways that low-income kids are left behind.

The Nation reports on infighting among the MSNBC anchors.

Monica Roberts at Transgriot posts her TRANScending Gender Keynote Speech.

Nordette at Blogher writes about the Obamas and the Huxtable Effect:

Yes, many Americans enjoyed the The Cosby Show and many African-Americans wished they were the Huxtables, but speculation about whether or not the Huxtable family influenced America’s love affair with the Obama family, seems to focus more on white acceptance of the Obamas and the belief that the Obamas and the Huxtables are post-racial or universal.

Hyphen points our attention toward a study that uncovered a glass ceiling in the workplace – for Chinese Americans:

According to a press release about study:

    Chinese Americans, one of the most highly educated groups in the nation, are confronted by a “glass ceiling,” unable to realize full occupational stature and success to match their efforts, and that on average, Chinese American professionals in the legal and medical fields earn as much as 44 percent less than their white counterparts
    .
    The study was done by the University of Maryland Asian American Studies Program with support from the Organization of Chinese Americans.

    An interesting point the authors bring up is that Chinese Americans are split evenly between “poorly educated recent immigrants from China and a more settled, acculturated, educated and prosperous group of older immigrants and second generation Americans. These earlier arrivals came mainly from Taiwan and Hong Kong.”

An op-ed in the Philadelphia Inquirer explores “environmental racism” aimed toward Philadephia’s Chinatown community:

City officials required an environmental impact review and took almost a year and a half considering plans for the original proposed site of a Foxwoods casino on the riverfront in South Philadelphia. But the new site, near Philadelphia’s Chinatown, is being fast-tracked, without meaningful input from the people most affected. There is an obvious disparity of process and transparency.

Why does Chinatown have to deal with more of a burden than the rest of the city or state? The casino could bring in hundreds of cars per hour, air pollution and congestion, petty and organized crime, and increased gambling addiction in the Asian community. While catering to the concerns of other neighborhoods and Foxwoods, city officials are not doing their part to represent Chinatown.

This type of economic development is built on the backs of a community of color that has been neglected at best and exploited at worst.