Month: September 2008

September 24, 2008 / / latino/a

by Guest Contributor Marisol LeBron, originally published at Post Pomo Nuyorican Homo Reggaetonero SieteNueve has…

Read the PostQuedate Callao!

September 24, 2008 / / black

by Guest Contributor Tami, originally published at What Tami Said

Why is it that television writers, who are capable of creating story lines beyond our wildest imaginings, still can’t paint black characters that rise above tired stereotypes?

I’m hooked on Alan Ball’s (Six Feet Under, American Beauty) new HBO series, True Blood. The drama, based on the Sookie Stackhouse series of books by Charlaine Harris, centers on Sookie, a waitress in fictional Bon Temps, Louisiana. In the world of True Blood, vampires are “out” and fighting for their rights as American citizens. TruBlood, a new synthetic product produced by a Japanese company, means proud vampire Americans can get the nutrition they need without, well, you know, offing anyone. Now, the living dead and the living rub elbows at night, much to the chagrin of conservative citizens, and religious and political leaders, who don’t feel minorities should receive “special” rights.

Read the Post True Blood. Tired Stereotypes.

September 23, 2008 / / Uncategorized
September 23, 2008 / / african-american

by Guest Contributor M. Dot, originally published at Model Minority

Zane sells because her fiction allows Black women to be sexual in a culture that refuses to acknowledge that we are sexual, a culture that calls us hos if are so inclined to be sexual, talk about sex, or even look like we are human and have a sexual appetite.

When was the last time you saw a Black woman have a love interest and sex in a movie?

Or a tv show?

Yesterday, I was doing all this reading of Hortense Spillers, Tricia Rose and Hegel (whom I struggle with tremendously), as I am developing an outline for a writing sample.

When instantly, Zane’s popularity clicked for me.

Professor Spillers essay titled, Intercises: A Small Drama of Words discusses, the position of Black women’s sexuality in American culture.

She writes,

Our sexuality remains an unarticulated nuance in various forms of public discourse as though we are figments of the great invisible empire of womankind.

If I attempted to lay hold to any fictional text-discursively rendered experience of Black women, by themselves- I encounter a disturbing silence that acquires paradox, the status of contradiction.

Read the Post I Know Why Zane Sells

September 23, 2008 / / links

Ta-Nehisi Coates – Let It Come

Rick Perlstein has outlined how Nixon basically turned a victimology of white struggle into a political career. Then there are the racists who terrorized the black middle class in the South, and then routinely charged that they, themselves, were the aggrieved, not the blacks who they’d just run out of town. White victimology is lamentable and ultimately accepted, mostly because the “white working class” is more an idea, an weird amalgam of the purity of the white Southern belle and nobleness of the savage, than an actual group of people. Still it’s been a sight to watch the same clucking heads that dismiss black people for “a culture of failure” and for worshiping ignorance, now tell us that it’s fine for someone who potentially holds the fate of civilization in their hands to know as much about the Bush Doctrine as the man on the street, to think that “Intelligent Design” is science. Enough, indeed. Marion Barry wrecked D.C. These fools are talking about the world.


Threadbared – Homeless Chic (full post)

“The people with the best style, for me, are the people that are the poorest. Like, when I go down to like Venice Beach and I see the homeless, I’m like, oh my god, you’re pulling out like crazy looks. They pulled shit out of like garbage bags.” – Erin Wasson to NylonTV* (posted to Fashionista)

“It is currently ‘in’ for the young and well-fed to go around in torn rags [most recently seen as “hobo chic,” or “dumpster chic,” as best embodied by Mary-Kate Olsen v.2006], but not for tramps to do so. In other words, the appropriation of other people’s dress is fashionable provided it is perfectly clear that you are, in fact, different from whoever would normally wear such clothes.” –Judith Williamson, 1986, “Woman Is An Island: Femininity and Colonization,” in Studies in Entertainment: Critical Approaches to Mass Culture, Tania Modeleski, ed., Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 116.

* It’s as if NYLON can’t stop being ridiculous.

Read the Post Long Form Links – Politics, Homeless Chic, Waiting

September 23, 2008 / / asian-american
September 22, 2008 / / race