Racialicious in the Boston Globe

by Carmen Van Kerckhove

There’s an interesting article in The Boston Globe about race in videogames, and it name-checks Latoya and Racialicious! Here are some excerpts:

Karen Dill, a psychology professor at Lenoir-Rhyne College in North Carolina, told the congressional Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection in September that video games blatantly stereotype minorities. A recent study she co-wrote, “Playing With Prejudice: The Prevalence and Consequences of Racial Stereotypes in Videogames,” analyzed the representation of minorities in photographs used to promote stories in the top video game magazines published in 2006. The study found black and Latino men were more likely to be portrayed as athletes or aggressors. Black men were less likely to wear protective armor or use technology than whites. Asians were often portrayed as intellectually superior but physically inferior…

Deadline Games CEO Mottes, a South African who worked in the anti-apartheid movement, took particular offense when his games Total Overdose and Chili Con Carnage were panned for their stereotypical depictions of Mexicans. Mottes’s post on gamedaily.com last year delved into the issue of racism and the video game industry: “We have to find the nuances other than to accept that there’s no place for these kind of stereotypes or storytelling methods.” In an interview, Mottes defended the use of stereotypes as a form of comedy. “I can’t think of a comedian or comic movie that doesn’t play on stereotypes,” he says.

To some, Mottes’s argument for the use of stereotypes fails to provide the nuance he accuses his critics of lacking. Latoya Peterson, an avid gamer who wrote about Mottes’s post on the blog Racialicious, doesn’t think stereotypes can ever be seen as positive. “They say, ‘Oh it’s just a game, don’t worry about it,’ ” Peterson says. “Wait a minute. The game also is a part of entertainment that . . . informs how you look at things and reinforces mindsets.”